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Category Archives: General Genealogy News

Workmens'  accounts book from Doneraile Papers:  1839 -  1840.  NLI Ms. 19, 726

Labourers in Doneraile, Cork in 1839/40

By | Genealogy Research, General Genealogy News | One Comment
Small Sources 29.   This list shows Labourers on the Doneraile Estate in Cork in 1839/40. It includes 21 men, 2 boys and 1 woman.    The names were extracted from a document among the Doneraile Papers  in the National Library of Ireland entitled “Workmen’s accounts book, 18 May 1839 -25 Apr. 1840”  (Ms. 19,726) which shows the dates worked and payments made to each worker.  Our female readers may be interested to know that the payment for the solitary female worker, Johanna Glynn,  was 6 pence per day, whereas the men were paid 10 pence and even the boys received 6.5 pence per day.   These were the permanent workers on the estate.  This can be determined by the fact that most also appear in an 1847  Valuation of Doneraile town as residents of Mallow lane.  This document, a House Book compiled during the Valuation of Doneraile Town can be accessed on the Find My Past website.  The page of the Valuation contains a note ‘This is the South side of Mallow Lane, Lord Doneraile’s workers’ and it is also noted that the workers paid no rent. The estate had leases on many properties in Doneraile town and this line of cottages was apparently allocated to the workers.   The date of this valuation is also significant as it shows that all of these workers survived the Great Famine which lasted from 1845-1847.

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Grand Jury Presentments

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Extract from the Grand Jury Presentment for the City of Dublin 1806/7.

                                               Extract from Grand Jury Presentment of Dublin City 1806/07.

The relative shortage of Irish sources makes every record linking a name to a place useful. One of the obscure sources which can be used are the Grand Jury Presentments. Grand Juries were the forerunners of the modern County Councils. They were a panel of major landowners established in each county to make decisions on legal and other matters.  Although originally responsible only for the Justice system, but this was gradually expanded to commissioning of local public works, i.e. building of roads and bridges, and maintenance of public buildings (infirmaries, courthouses, jails etc). It funded these works by means of a county tax on land, known as a cess or ‘rates’. Catholics could not legally serve on grand juries until 1793, and even after this date the jury lists were still predominantly Protestant. They met in spring and summer, just after the regular Assizes (local court) sessions. In these sessions they would hear ‘presentments’, i.e. proposals for grants for the construction or maintenance of roads and bridges etc;  and they would also hear consider and approve payments to public officials for services rendered. The family history relevance of these documents  is that (a)  the proposals usually include the names of proposed contractors and (in some counties) the names of the persons providing services (see example from Dublin above) ; and (b)  on occasion, they specify the work to be done by reference to the property of individuals. For example ‘to build a bridge over the river Lingane at Maurice Shea’s house’ or ‘to repair .. the mail coach road.. between Timothy Duggan’s ditch and Thomas Butler’s gate, all in the townland of Ballydrihid’ (Both from Limerick Grand Jury Presentments of  1831).  These references usually include not only approved projects,  but also those proposed, but not approved, for funding.

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Labourers in Muff, Co. Donegal in 1758 & 1759.

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NLI Ms. 7885 Rental and accounts of the Hart family of Kilderry, Co. Donegal, 1757-1767 and 1796-1803.

Small Sources 28:  This little list of 14 labourers working on the farm of the Hart family of Kilderry House, near Muff, Co. Donegal in 1758 and 1759 is in the National Library of Ireland  Ms. 7885. It is interesting for several reasons, not least being that Donegal records are rare, particularly for the 18th century, and lists of labourers are even rarer.   In the book ‘The Hart family of Donegal’ by Henry Travers Hart,  the author notes that in this period  “the whole of the fields were rigidly cultivated by a staff of labourers … and by this means Kilderry House was rendered more tenantable on account of the better drainage of the soil..”.   It also notes that there were large numbers of labourers employed, so why these 14 are specifically cited in the records is not clear. It may be that they were only occasional workers.  The records show that they were paid for around 60 days within a 6-month period.

The list  is notable secondly for the occurrence of some interesting names. The forename Tadgh (pronounced teig; or hear its pronunciation here)  is not uncommon in Ireland.  Tadhg Furlong is one of the current heroes of the Irish Rugby team, for instance.   However, it is usually converted to Timothy in older records. Its popularity in some parts of Northern Ireland led to the name (rendered as Taig) being used as a pejorative term for Catholics.   The other unusual name is Nahor or Naher (spelt Knogher in this record). A Knogher Dogherty is also listed among the tenants of the estate. This name is very specific to Donegal. For instance, in the 1901 census there are only 14 persons of this name recorded, all of them in the Northern counties and 11 in Donegal. An identical name, of Biblical origin is sometimes found in non-Irish records, but is not related.

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Tenants of the Trant Estate in Dingle 1791

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ky-nli-ms-31561-1-11This rental of 63 tenants in the Dingle area of County Kerry is in the Trant Papers in the National Library of Ireland collection. The Trant family were originally from this area of Co. Kerry but moved in the early 1800s to an estate in Dovea, Co. Tipperary.  They continued to own land  in Kerry until the 1820s.  Information on the Trant family and their estates is in the Landed Estates Database. The tenant names listed below are extracted from several loose-page rentals relating to the Trant Kerry holdings in 1791/92:  the NLI references to these items are Ms 31,561 Items 15 and Ms 31,561 Item 16.  The Trant family also had holdings in several other counties at this time.    The Kerry properties are indicated in the documents as then being the property of William Trant, a minor.  Most of the locations mentioned are townlands in civil parishes on the western end of the Dingle Peninsula, i.e. Kilmalkedar, Garfinny, Dingle and Ventry (all in the Barony of Corkaguiny).  Others could not be identified with any certainty. The holding sizes are very varied, with rents varying from 10 shillings to 60 pounds.  This is a valuable list as there a few other sources for this region at this time.    The earliest Catholic records in the area are in Kilmalkedar (Ballyferriter) in 1807,  while Dingle records do not start until 1825.     Flyleaf Press publish a comprehensive guide to research in this county ‘Finding your Ancestors in Kerry‘.      Ancestor Network will offer 1 free hour of research by a professional researcher to conduct further research on these individuals, and/or to obtain copies of the original documents. Click here and quote ‘Kerry SS27’ in the subject line.

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spin-nli

Kilkenny Women Flax-spinners in 1827

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Small Sources 26.  Evidence of women in Irish genealogical sources is unfortunately sparse, and those that do occur are often listed only as e.g. ‘Widow Murphy’. We list here 83 women receiving payments in 1827 for spinning and weaving of flax. The documents are in the  Bessborough papers in the National Library of Ireland Ms 29,805 (1).   The family had very extensive estates in Kilkenny and their residence was Bessborough House at Piltown in the civil parish of Fiddown.  The house and estate are now an agricultural college    The family lived in England until 1825 when the 4th Earl of Bessborough and his wife came to live there, with their 11 children.  They were ‘improving’ landlords and encouraged local industry and crafts.   Although residences for the women are not specified, it is logical that the women lived in the immediate vicinity of the estate.  There was no practical reason why the farm management would seek flax spinners further than was necessary.  Almost all of the surnames appear locally in the Griffith Valuation returns (1850) and in the Tithe Applotment Survey.  In particular, 15 of the 83 family names appear in the neighbouring townland of Belline & Rogerstown; 6 in Tobernabrone; 6 in Banagher and 6 in Fiddown.
Flax spinning involved making yarn by spinning, or twisting, fibres of flax into a thread.  It was uniquely women’s work at the time and involved using a spinning wheel operated by a foot treadle.  The yarn was then transferred to the weaver to be woven into linen cloth.   Linen-making was popular as it provided work throughout the year, and also involved several members of the household.  Men were involved in growing and processing the flax, and in weaving.  Women were involved in the spinning and (later in the century) also in weaving.   At the period of this list (1827) the work was still done by hand.  Steam-powered spinning machines later resulted in rapid decline in hand-spinning.  Machine-spinning became centered in large Ulster mills and the cottage-industry gradually disappeared.  Weaving, on the other hand, was maintained partly because of the availability of machine-spun thread.

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tourin

Residents of Tourin townland, Waterford in 1841.

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Small Sources 25: This list shows 26 residents of the townland of Tourin, (in the Civil parish of Lismore and Mocollop, Co. Waterford ) in 1841. The list is on a single loose page among papers of the Devonshire Estate, which are in the National Library of Ireland (Ms. 43,781/ 3).    The legend to the list states “The above-named persons live on the lands of Tourin. B Musgrave 1841 June 3rd”. The specific purpose of the list is not clear but the Musgrave family had a residence close by, and  were building a further family house and developing a large garden at this location at this time, so it may be related to this work. This new house still exists and is now open to visitors (see http://tourin.ie/about-tourin-house).

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MS 43,760/ 31 List of labourers  (July 1850)  in accounts of Francis E. Curry for expenditure on the Duke of Devonshire’s Irish estates

Labourers in Lismore, Waterford in 1850.

By | Genealogy Research, General Genealogy News | No Comments

Small Sources 24. This small list shows 30 Labourers on the Devonshire Estate, Lismore, Co. Waterford in 1850. Lists of workmen are useful as they tend to be difficult to find in the records. The names were extracted from several documents in the a file of accounts of the Devonshire Estate in the National Library of Ireland, which show the dates worked and payments made to each worker on dates in 1850.    Most are also tenants on the estate and paying their rent through labour.    The names are listed as spelled, and with the abbreviations used, e.g. Michl. = Michael, Wm. = William etc . The originals are in National Library of Ireland Ms. 43,760/1.     Ancestor Network will offer 1 free hour of research by a professional researcher to conduct further research on these individuals or others in these estate papers and/or to obtain copies of the original. Click here and quote ‘Waterford SS24’ in the subject line.

John Power
Wm. Ahern
Jas. Nugent (Neugant in 1 list)
Michl. Roach
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NGS Quarterly review of ‘Finding your Ancestors in Kerry’

By | Genealogy Research, General Genealogy News, Uncategorized | No Comments

The National Genealogical Society Quarterly recently published a review of our title ‘Finding your Ancestors in Kerry‘  by Kay Caball.  The review,  by Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann,  kindly declares the book to be  “..essential reading for any genealogist or family historian whose research focuses on (Kerry)…” and also goes on to say that  ” This book, friendly and easy to read, would appeal to any beginner.  Finding your Ancestors in Kerry also also covers enough ground to reveal documents of interest even to experienced genealogists“.     It is available here.   The book is a comprehensive guide to tracing ancestors in County Kerry.  It describes all the various sources of family history  information,  where  each of these can be accessed and how to best use them in your research.   The people of Kerry have a rich history.  Although very predominantly Gaelic,  their origins  include  Normans, English, Danish Vikings, French Huguenots and German Palatines.  All of these have contributed to the character of twentieth century Kerry.

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AN Belfast

Ancestor Network Moves To Establish Branch in Northern Ireland

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Belfast and Dublin, 17 October 2017

Because of growing demand from people of the Irish Diaspora with Ulster roots, as well as demand from solicitor firms and heir hunting firms for specialist genealogical researchers in the six counties, Ancestor Network Ltd (www.ancestornetwork.ie) has announced today the establishment of its Northern Ireland branch and the opening of its new Belfast office (www.ancestornetwork.co.uk). The branch is headed by Michael Rooney, a native of Northern Ireland, who is the Permanent Representative and Lead Genealogist for Ancestor Network in Belfast. The registered address of the Northern Ireland branch is 138 University Street, Belfast, BT71HJ, Northern Ireland.

Ancestor Network is the first Irish genealogy research, advisory and publishing company to establish offices in both the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland. Read More

dublin-4th-cover-for-web

New edition of ‘Tracing your Dublin Ancestors’

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Flyleaf Press,  the publishing arm of Ancestor Network,   has published a fourth edition of ‘Tracing your Dublin Ancestors’’ by James G Ryan and Brian Smith.    The title   is a comprehensive guide to all of the records available for tracing families in the city and county of Dublin and is filled with information on what the records contain, and how and where they can be accessed. This includes guidance on researching in the many archives in Dublin City.  It is well illustrated with maps and with examples of the types of records to be found; and with other relevant background material.  It also provides background on the social history of Dublin and how this history has affected the keeping and survival of records. There is also a comprehensive index.  You can order it here.

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